Remember the M-Jewelry Kickstarter from the beginning of this week? Three days into the project and Makex have smashed their initial goal, with funding for the M-Jewelry having already doubled to $105,774.

Going above and beyond their monetary targets has now become something of a trend for Makex, as the M-Jewelry follows in the path of their 2014 Kickstarter fund for the M-One desktop DLP printer, which eventually closed out at $80,481 above their initial $100,000 goal.

Example of the M-Jewely custom made rings that are being offered to backers. Image via: Makex on Kickstarter

Example of the M-Jewely custom made rings that are being offered to backers. Image via: Makex on Kickstarter

With that said, the M-Jewelry seems to be on track to better even this earlier and substantial amount as there are still 27 days to go, success that surely serves as testament to the quality of Makex products, and an ability to identify and serve one of the most demanding niches in the 3D printing market.

With the added influx of cash, Makex have added an extra perk for backers pledging enough own a printer, and are throwing in 4 extra pieces of film to further ensure the longevity of the resin vat. It is the first of a total of four stretch goals which promise to provide backers extra resin, a custom silver ring, and an extra resin vat respectively upon hitting each stretch goal up to $300k.

M-jewelry stretch goals set out on their Kickstarter.

M-jewelry stretch goals set out on their Kickstarter.

Further project updates have included information on the jewelry-centric improvements made to their existing XMaker design software that serve to enhance the capabilities of M-Jewelry. M-ONE can automatically add a support structure to a design, and users can take advantage of newly designed tree structures that provide minimal contact to a printed object, taking some of the complication out of post-production.

Screenshot of the auto-support feature in the M-One software. Photo via: Makex

Screenshot of the auto-support feature in the M-One software. Photo via: Makex

Additionally, Makex have also created software to print objects made from the shape of custom sound waves, serving the current trend for artworks showing the peaks and troughs of a favorite song or, even more romantically, the way a person says ‘I love you’.

Example of the TouchVoice software developed by Makex

Example of the TouchVoice software developed by Makex Image via: Makex.com

While using 3D printing to craft jewelry may divide opinion in the professionals who do it for a living, as a consumer, and with jewelry being such inherently personal objects, the ability to more easily buy custom-made pieces is what makes the M-Jewelry so exciting. For one thing, it should certainly be much easier to predict and adjust a ring for the perfect fit.

Featured image: A ring created through the use of M-Jewelry, photo via: Makex.com

Comments

comments