In this edition of our 3D printing news digest: Sliced, we feature updates from Tethon3D, Trumpf, Roboze, Polymertal, Borgiform, German RepRap, Sony and Formlabs.

Tethon3D announces new SLA resin material

Nebraskan material company, Tethon3D has announced a new glass ceramic polymer resin for SLA printing. Vitrolite, when printed, is semi-translucent with a glossy finish, the material does not conduct heat or electricity and is chemical resistant. According to Karen Linder, President and CEO of Tethon3D,

Vitrolite has a relatively low recommended sintering temperature of 2000F. The higher Vitrolite is fired, the less porous and more glass-like it becomes and this is still achieved at a fairly low temperature. The availability of a range of low firing temperatures gives the Vitrolite user a lot of options for controlling the object’s functionality and appearance.

3D printed parts using Vitrolite. Photo via Tethon3D.

3D printed parts using Vitrolite. Photo via Tethon3D.

Trumpf expands Group Management

German machining company, Trumpf has announced an expansion to its management board with the addition of Heinz-Jürgen Prokop and Christian Schmitz. The pair have both been working for Trumpf for several years. Elsewhere, Peter Leibinger will now work on development of new technologies within the company, such as additive manufacturing.

Trumpf are pioneers of metal additive manufacturing, with their Laser Metal Fusion (LMF) and Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) processes, and are now partners with Siemens PLM to make use of Siemens NX software.

Aerofoil shape created using Laser metal deposition. Image from Trumpf.

Aerofoil shape created using Laser metal deposition. Image from Trumpf.

Roboze forms partnership with Polymertal

Italian 3D printer company, Roboze has announced a partnership with Israeli metal company Polymertal. The Israeli company specializes in metal plating 3D printed parts.

3D printed plastic part before it is metal plated. Image via Roboze.

3D printed plastic part before it is metal plated. Image via Roboze.

Following the alliance, Polymertal will acquire a Roboze One 400+ 3D printer to advance their metal plated parts, otherwise known as ‘hybrid products.’ According to Polymertal, the hybrid parts offer threefold benefits, they reduce weight by up to 70%, reduce time to market by up to 50% and save costs by up to 30%.

The result of Polymertal's plating process. Image via Roboze.

The result of Polymertal’s plating process. Image via Roboze.

German bureau Borgiform utilizes German RepRap

Borgiform, a family company from Westphalia, Germany has detailed its use of 3D printing solutions from German RepRap. Borgiform has implemented 3D printing to reduce costs and speed up production time. 

Inspecting a 3D printed part for the automotive industry. Photo via German RepRap.

Inspecting a 3D printed part for the automotive industry. Photo via German RepRap.

The German manufacturing company has two 3D printers, the German RepRap X350Pro and X400. The company has been able to produce 3D printed parts to prototype and to provide a visual guide for the manufacturing processes.

3D printed gearbox part made of multiple components and welded together. Photo via German RepRap.

3D printed gearbox part made of multiple components and welded together. Photo via German RepRap.

Sony Fabrication Arts using Form 2 3D printer

North American 3D printer manufacturers Formlabs recently visited Sony’s Playstation Campus and documented how their 3D printing technology is being used. The case study focuses on Sony employee, Gary Barth’s use of a Form 2 machine to iterate prototypes for collectible figures, promo items, props and costumes. Barth began using the technology last year and gives two examples of his use.

The 3D printed Nathan Drake from Uncharted head. Photo via Formlabs.

The 3D printed Nathan Drake from Uncharted head. Photo via Formlabs.

Gary Barth showcased his use of SLA 3D printing to recreate video game character Nathan Drake, the protagonist from Naughty Dog’s Uncharted series. He used SLA printing to fabricate the model head and strategically placed supports in Drake’s hair to minimize the damage from post-processing. As he says,

If you’re making collectible statues, the minute you start sanding, you’re softening detail. With the Form 2, you snap the support material off pretty cleanly and with a little light sanding, you’re ready to primer.

The trophies that were made using 3D printed molds. Photo via Formlabs.

The trophies that were made using 3D printed molds. Photo via Formlabs.

Barth also gave an example using the Form 2 to produce trophies for an internal employee award ceremony. The awards were half scale hands gripping a Playstation controller and were used as molds in the metal casting process.

As readers will be aware, we’re also in the process of making trophies for our 3D Printing Industry Awards. Our awards will be made using FDM 3D printed metal and designed by the winner of a design competition.

Don’t forget to place your votes in the 3D Printing Industry Awards.

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Featured image shows the Sliced logo over an image of 3D printed Nathan Drake. Image via Formlabs. 

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