3D printing has been used to create a stylish camera capable of taking panoramic photographs. The camera is nicknamed the “Cycloptic Mustard Monster” and combines the features of three iconic film cameras. It was created by London-based designer and economics graduate Paul Kohlhaussen.

Top view of the PK-6142016, "Cycloptic Mustard Monster" camera. Photo credit Paul Kohlhaussen

Top view of the PK-6142016, “Cycloptic Mustard Monster” camera. Photo credit Paul Kohlhaussen

Reverse engineering the perfect camera

The three cameras used in Kohlhaussen Cycloptic Mustard Monster are:

  • A Mamiya 7 camera: first introduced in 1995 and capable of taking typical 6 cm × 7 cm sized photographs, described by Kohlhaussen as a “practical take on medium format”.
  • A Leica M series: introduced 1954–66 and admired by Kohlhaussen and other enthusiasts “for its iconic design.”
  • And the Hasselblad XPan used to take panoramic photos.

 

The three cameras used to make the PK-6142016 by Paul Kohlhaussen. From left to right: a Mamiya 7, Leica M series and the Hasselblad XPan. Photos via: Chris Ford photography, freestylephoto.biz and mir.com.my

The three cameras used to make the PK-6142016 by Paul Kohlhaussen. From left to right: a Mamiya 7, Leica M series and the Hasselblad XPan. Photos via: Chris Ford photography, freestylephoto.biz and mir.com.my

To combine the best features of each of these cameras into a single body, Kohlhaussen CAD modeled a new design using AutoDesk Fusion 360, winner of the 3D Printing Industry Award 3D software of the year. This body design was SLS 3D printed in a nylon polyamide material, and then finished with an automotive primer and mustard colored paint.

The finished PK-6142016. Photo by Paul Kohlhaussen

The finished PK-6142016. Photo by Paul Kohlhaussen

The only parts not 3D printed for the camera are the lens and bolts used to hold the casing together, though these parts have also been made from plastic in other homemade camera projects.

Photos from the PK-6142016 are 6 x 14 cm, with negatives on 120mm film.

Sample photo taken on the Cycloptic Mustard Monster. Photo by Paul Kohlhaussen

Sample photo taken on the Cycloptic Mustard Monster. Photo by Paul Kohlhaussen

The camera was a product design entry to the 3D Hubs Student Grant, a Grant given annually to students who show the best use of 3D printing in the fields of architecture, product design and engineering.

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Featured image shows: Exploded view of the the PK-6142016, “Cycloptic Mustard Monster” camera. Photo credit Paul Kohlhaussen

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