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3DPRINTUK announces formal merger with Additive

3DPRINTUK has acquired fellow London based 3D printing service bureau Additive, formerly known as Digits2Widgets, in order to strengthen its position in the UK market and expand the services available to its customers.

The formal merger also builds upon the series of expansion activities undertaken by 3DPRINTUK last year, as part of a million-pound investment in facilities, equipment, capacity, and new material offerings. The acquisition is expected to benefit the customers of both 3DPRINTUK and Additive, providing them with a greater range of services and capabilities.

“With both companies being located in London, Additive and 3DPRINTUK have long been friends in the industry,” said Nick Allen, 3DPRINTUK CEO. “This has largely been driven by mutually high standards for quality 3D printed parts alongside a determined effort by both companies to maintain realistic expectations around the use of additive technologies. 

“As a result, this feels like a very natural progression. I can categorically state that 3DPRINTUK will continue to strive to improve the already high standards of both companies.”

3DPRINTUK and Additive logos.
3DPRINTUK has acquired 3D printing service bureau Additive. Image via 3DPRINTUK.

3DPRINTUK’s expansion mission

Throughout 2020, 3DPRINTUK announced a string of activities geared towards expanding its services in line with a million pound investment in its facilities, equipment, and capabilities. 

In August last year, the firm invested in a PowerShot S system from DyeMansion, enabling it to offer a post processing service for low, medium, and high volumes of components. At the time of the announcement, Allen regarded this as an “important next step” in the company’s expansion, and stated that developing the firm’s post processing capabilities is a vital part of its business. Shortly after, 3DPRINTUK introduced new color options for its services by investing in Dyemansion’s DM60 dying machine, to enable it to offer parts in red, green, blue, and yellow.

3DPRINTUK also continued to multiple its range of 3D printing machinery through acquiring two EOS Formiga P396 machines, with which it expects to see a 38% reduction in energy consumption and considerably reduced downtimes between builds. In October, the firm added an HP Multi Jet Fusion (MJF) 5210 machine to its offering, which it will deploy for batch production applications while also providing customers with bespoke printed polymer parts.

3DPRINTUK’s investment in the HP Multi Jet Fusion machine is part of a £1 million expansion to enhance its 3D printing capabilities in London. Photo via HP.
3DPRINTUK’s investment in the HP Multi Jet Fusion machine is part of a £1 million expansion to enhance its 3D printing capabilities in London. Photo via HP.

Acquiring Additive

Additive was originally formed under the name Digits2Widgets back in 2008 by dentist and entrepreneur, Andrew Dawood. 3DPRINTUK’s formal merger with Additive builds on the company’s ongoing expansion strategy, and bringing Additive’s 3D printing capabilities into the 3DPRINTUK fold is expected to benefit the customers of both firms.

“I am delighted to put our business in the safe hands of Nick Allen and his team, who I know will continue to develop and extend the role of additive manufacturing in the UK,” said Dawood. “We would like to thank all of our clients and suppliers over the years, and most of all the amazing team members who have made it all happen.”

As of February 12, all of Additive’s 3D printing work has switched over to 3DPRINTUK. The services provider hinted at further announcements over the following months that will “open even greater opportunities” for the firm and its customers.

PrintCity will help businesses incorporate recycle materials into their own products through 3D printing technology. Photo via MMU.
PrintCity will help businesses incorporate 3D printing technologies and offer technical and business support. Photo via MMU.

Elsewhere, £3M 3D printing initiative aids Greater Manchester SMEs

Heading up to the North West of England, Manchester Metropolitan University is launching a £3.2 million scheme with the aim of educating companies in the Greater Manchester area in the use of 3D printing technologies. 

Named the PrintCity Network, the initiative will develop a network of 150 small-medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and support them in integrating 3D printing into their operations. In addition to providing a space for researchers, students, and businesses to train or upskill, and access to on-site 3D printing support, the PrintCity Network will offer participating SMEs fully-funded technical and business support throughout the pandemic, where finances might be stretched. 

“In the current climate, it will be essential to have a strong base of innovation ready businesses across Greater Manchester, in order to support our economy to recover post Covid-19,” said Mandy Parkinson, Head of Public Engagement at Manchester Metropolitan University. 

“We see the PrintCity Network as being a key player in helping the Greater Manchester business community in this and we will provide SMEs with a commercially proven step-by-step innovation process, with an end result of either having a product, service or process launchable.”

The initiative launches this month, and the first cohort of SMEs will be provided with support in April 2021.

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Featured image shows 3DPRINTUK has acquired 3D printing service bureau Additive. Image via 3DPRINTUK.

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