3D printing news in this edition of Sliced features: Concept Laser, Helios Klinikum Hildesheim, Bowe Dental Surgery, Axial3D, Coobx, 3D Hubs, and Donald Trump.

Concept Laser 3D printing metal craniomaxillofacial implants  

German metal 3D printing company, Concept Laser has announced its technology was used by KLS Martin to create craniomaxillofacial (CMF) implants. KLS Martin is a leading supplier of CMF surgery materials such as implants, plates, pins and screws.

The Concept Laser M2 Cusing machine was used to make 3D printed titanium implants. This process is allows for the production of custom made parts in a bio-compatible material. Frank Reinauer, Head of Innovation and Production of Biomaterials at KLM, voiced his approval of the M2 machine,

The complex part requirements for medical implants, even in light of very complicated rules and regulations, meant that the AM machine very quickly paid for itself. Given the pressure of time for an operating room, the amount of time saved with tool-free manufacturing should also not be underestimated.

The medical industry is just one use of metal additive manufacturing, as the US Navy has also implemented an M2 Cusing machine from Concept Laser.

Concept Laser Metal Demo. Photo by Michael Petch

Concept Laser Metal Demo. Photo by Michael Petch.

Cypriot 3D printed titanium hip implant

Elsewhere in Germany, doctors at the Helios Klinikum Hildesheim clinic have fitted a Cypriot woman with a 3D printed titanium hip implant showing the scope of metal 3D printing’s medical application. The 40 year-old woman has had several surgeries prior to the implant with none of them providing a lasting solution. Following the surgery, the patient Antzelina Kesidi said “When I came to Hildesheim, I could only walk in pain, and with walking aids. Now, for the first time after an operation, I am painless. It feels right.”

Similarly, an Australian woman received a titanium jaw implant to repair an injury that has lasted 30 years following a car crash.

The Concept Laser 3D printer used to create the implant. Photo via Helios Klinikum Hildesheim.

The Concept Laser 3D printer used to create the implant. Photo via Helios Klinikum Hildesheim.

Irish dental surgery invests in 3D digital dentistry

Bowe dental surgery in Limerick, Ireland has acquired a 3D CT scanner to begin implementing digital dentistry techniques. Dr Robert Bowe, who acquired the machine, explains he is now “better prepared and have a better understanding of each patients unique circumstances than ever before.” The scanner will be used by Bowe dental to prepare for surgery and see where implants will be positioned, he also said,

The machine really is amazing, the image quality is outstanding. This non invasive scanning technique combined with 3D digital software allows me to assess the patient’s mouth and perform virtual surgery in a high tech virtual world.

There are several 3D printing companies that provide digital dentistry solutions, with Formlabs extending their material offerings and 3D Systems announcing a commercial 3D printer primed for the dental market.

Dr Robert Bowe with 3D digital scans. Photo via Limerick Post.

Dr Robert Bowe with 3D digital scans. Photo via Limerick Post.

Belfast firm receives £530,000 funding for 3D printed surgical guides  

Axial3D, from Belfast UK has announced it has received investment of $662,288 in seed funding. The company specializes in 3D printing surgical guides. The largest investment came from Techstart NI who pledged £100,000 and Dr Sandy McKinnon, Investment Director at Techstart NI said,

Axial3D’s personalized anatomical models are already making profound impacts in both the quality and cost of surgical interventions. These physical 3D printed models allow surgeons to see and interact with their patient’s anatomy, removing the guesswork involved with interpreting MRI and CT scans.

Coobx announces automation LIFTcell process

Lichenstein 3D printing company, Coobx has announced the launch of a new autonomous system to aid the recently announced EXIGO 3D printer. Coobx launched the EXIGO SLA 3D printer in March  and tell us their machine is different from anything else on the market. To date, Coobx has announced three different models, with the largest LIFTcell configuration able to operate up to 12 EXIGO machines. Marco Schmid, CEO of Coobx told us by email,

LIFTcell is the logical extension of the EXIGO printer series. Having really fast, single printers is a blessing and a curse at the same time. Changing build platforms every 20 minutes and handling them in a non-qualified post process has nothing to do with additive production. We had the modular, automatizable systems already in mind during the design process of the EXIGO printers. We are proud to show off now these high productivity solutions for the industry.

The LIFTcell operating a number of EXIGO 3D printers. Image via Coobx.

The LIFTcell operating a number of EXIGO 3D printers. Image via Coobx.

3D Hubs student grant 

Online 3D printing service platform, 3D Hubs has announced the introduction of the 3D Hubs Student Grant, “for inventors, problem solvers and creative talents in STEAM subjects that push the boundaries of 3D printing.”

There are three different categories for the grant, engineering, product design and architecture each winning $500. The winner will be chosen for the best use of 3D printing.

The 3D Hubs student grant. Image via 3D Hubs.

The 3D Hubs student grant. Image via 3D Hubs.

3D printed robot burns Trump’s tweets

A twitter user known as ‘Burned Your Tweet’ has created a 3D printed robot that can autonomously burn Donald Trump’s tweets. The robot is impressive, despite the fact it may not be the best use of such ingenuity.

Make sure to cast your vote in the 3D Printing Industry Awards, and if you’d like to attend the event, tickets are available here.

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Featured image shows the Sliced logo over a screenshot of ‘burned your tweet’ on twitter. 

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