Fashion

Iris Van Herpen’s couture 3D printing stars in Paris Fashion Week 2018

3D printed fashions give designers a new means of expressing bold and inspiring looks. This week, the second of three 7 day events in the French capital’s fashion calendar, designers at Paris Fashion Week 2018 are flaunting the latest in Haute Couture.

One of a kind and tailor-made, Haute Couture is the perfect platform for 3D printing. And who better to show us how to do it than Dutch fashion designer Iris van Herpen.

On Monday at the Galerie de Minéralogie et de Géologie, van Herpen introduced her Spring/Summer 2018 collection. Each of the 21 garments are made using a cutting-edge digital technology – laser-cutting, parametric design or 3D printing – yet, each one has a natural, organic quality to it.

“Don’t forget how engineered nature is, itself,” van Herpen comments in an article for Vogue, “I think we as humans don’t even come close to the intelligence within nature,”

“It’s funny how people think that nature is simple and technology is complex—it’s the opposite; technology is simple and nature is complex.”

Fine, 3D printed foliage

‘Foliage’ is one of three fabrication techniques showcased by van Herpen in the Ludi Nature (Nature Play) 2018 collection. With the technique, van Herpen 3D prints delicate leaf pattern directly onto a fine, semi-transparent fabric.

The ‘Foliage’ leaves can be as thin as 0.8 mm “creating exceptional softness,” and a dress that flows natural – as if it didn’t include plastic at all.

Thin, 3D printed leaves, line the fine fabric of a dress in Iris van Herpen's Spring/Summer collection 2018. Photo by Yannis Vlamos/TU Delft
Thin, 3D printed leaves, line the fine fabric of a dress in Iris van Herpen’s Spring/Summer collection 2018. Photo by Yannis Vlamos/TU Delft

Amy Verner of Vogue Magazine writes that the illusory, 3D printed fabrics “have become so precise that you feel she is resurfacing the topography of the human body.”

Foliage 3D printed embellishments in the Ludi Nature collection. Photos via Iris van Herpen
Foliage embellishments in the Ludi Nature collection. Photos via Iris van Herpen

The ‘Foliage’ technique was developed in collaboration with the Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) that has, incidentally, conducted some interesting 4D printed material experiments for items that “self-assemble” on demand.

Entropy and Data Dust

In a second ‘Entropy’ process, van Herpen describes a technique of bonding of mylar polyester, “nude leather and liquid fabric,” to be lasercut and interwoven, to create a graded, undulating fabric.”

Laser cut fashion is all the rage in look 11 of the collection. Photo via Iris van Herpen
Laser cut fashion is all the rage in look 11 of the collection. Photo via Iris van Herpen

In the last technique, ‘Data Dust’, computational algorithms are used to make parametric patterns laser cut to hug an invisible silk tulle netting, creating what van Herpen terms “radiant glitches.”

Made from 'Data Dust' a haute couture model walks down the runway in one of van Herpen's latest designs. Photo via Iris van Herpen
Made from ‘Data Dust’ a haute couture model walks down the runway in one of van Herpen’s latest designs. Photo via Iris van Herpen

See it live

Haute Couture shows at Paris Fashion Week will run until 25th January 2018. The final, and most famous of all the events (Women’s week) will take place from the 27th February – 6th March.

New York Fashion Week will be bringing all the latest fashion to the States from the 8th to the 14th of February, however, there are many events around the country seeking to make the most of the Spring/Summer season.

From 27th January, an exhibition at Florida Institute of Technology’s Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts aims to explore digital themes similar to those expressed in van Herpen’s work. The show, titled Coded Couture, “presents garments, video, objects, drawings, photographs and interactive elements by 10 national and international designers” created in the theme of coding – to “convert something into a code so as to convey a secret meaning.” 3D printing is tipped to be a part of the exhibit.

Stay on trend with the latest 3D printing applications and subscribe to our newsletter, follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook.

Nominate the best 3D printing applications in the 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards. 

Featured image shows look 0126 in Iris van Herpen’s Ludi Nature collection. Photo via Iris van Herpen

 

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry mailing list to receive the latest Additive Manufacturing industry news, insights developments and analysis.

You have Successfully Subscribed!