Danit Peleg is an Israeli fashion designer we’ve talked about before on multiple occasions, and it’s no wonder- her 3D printed fashion is fantastic. Since graduating from Shenkar in 2015, she has brought a fusion of technology and fashion to catwalks and tech conventions worldwide. For the 2016 Paralympic Opening Ceremony in Rio de Janeiro this week, American snowboarder Amy Purdy was the latest to don one of Peleg’s designs.

American snowboarder Amy Purdy and robot dance together at the Paralympic opening ceremony.

American snowboarder Amy Purdy and robot dance together at the Paralympic opening ceremony. Image: Youtube

American snowboarder Amy Purdy and robot dance together at the opening ceremony. Image: YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP

American snowboarder Amy Purdy and robot dance together at the Paralympic Opening Ceremony. Image: YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP

Another design influenced by a famous piece of art, the dress worn by Amy Purdy was inspired by Boticelli’s The Birth of Venus. It was printed using a soft, nude colored filament FilaFlex, a TPE thermoplastic elastomer base polyurethane made by Recreus, which allowed for movement.

The 3D printed material. Image: DanitPeleg.com

The 3D printed material. Image: DanitPeleg.com

“It is an incredible opportunity to design a 3D printed dress that will be seen in movement by hundreds of millions of people around the globe.” Peleg said on her blog.

“The dance segment explores the relationship between humans and technology as Amy dances a samba with the KUKA robot, which was fitting because 3D printers are also a type of robot. I loved the idea of creating a dress for Amy Purdy, a beautifully strong woman who is also a double-leg amputee. With an incredibly strong character and the help of technology Amy can walk, become a Paralympic medalist, dance with the stars, and now dance at this incredibly moving ceremony!”

Danit Peleg. Image: DanitPeleg.com

Danit Peleg working on the dress. Image: DanitPeleg.com

Peleg used the same techniques she had employed on her previous projects; the dress was entirely 3D printed and was made with the assistance of Gerber Technology.

“I worked closely with my partners at Gerber Technology to create a fast workflow to work with two software for pattern-making and 3D modeling: Accumark & Blender. In the near future, Gerber will make it so we can use just Accumark to go from pattern-making to printing.” said Peleg on her blog.

“I used the new version of the Witbox, which was 3X faster than the one I used last year, so it took me “only” 100 hours to print the dress (as opposed to 300 hours last year).”

Witbox. Image: Danit Peleg

Witbox. Image: DanitPeleg.com

Peleg was so inspired by what she was working on, that she has designed a full collection of five looks, which will be unveiled in the next few weeks.

Danit Peleg. Image: DanitPeleg.com

Danit Peleg. Image: DanitPeleg.com

Featured image: Amy Purdy. Image: WWD.com

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