Cincinnati, OH, based Polar 3D are the first recipient of the $10 million GE Additive fund set up to advance the use of additive manufacturing. Over the coming two years $2 million will be spent by GE on Polar 3D classroom packages and 3D printers.

Polar 3D printer in use. Photo via Polar 3D.

Polar 3D printer in use. Photo via Polar 3D.

The growth of additive experimentation

Commenting on the news Greg LaLonde, Polar 3D CEO said, “We are thrilled to participate in the Program and appreciate the opportunity.”

LaLonde added,

With GE’s leadership and the power of our educational institutions, we believe student access to 3D printing and inquiry-driven project-based learning will reach an inflection point where network effects kick in and the growth of additive experimentation by our students will follow an exponential, rather than linear, trajectory.  Now is the time to inform and empower these students for an additive world.

Greg Morris, Strategy & Growth Leader of GE Additive said,

We selected Polar because of their commitment to education, strength of curriculum that integrates 3D printing in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math and the open Polar Cloud platform. We are excited to watch the ecosystem grow and develop pipelines of future talent in additive manufacturing.

Initial applications due by end of February

The timeline for the process will be as follows:

Primary and secondary schools (ages 8-18)

  • February 28, 2017 – Introductory applications due
  • March 15, 2017 – Down-selected schools notified
  • April 7, 2017 – Detailed applications due
  • April 28, 2017 – Final selections notified

The remaining $8 million in earmarked funds will be spent over the next five years. This money will be used to purchase metal 3D printing technology for colleges and universities. It is anticipated that more than 50 3D printing systems will be purchased as part of the program.

Last week General Electric reported an increase in revenue of more than $10 billion for their most recent financial year.

Nominations are open for the 1st Annual 3D Printing Awards, you can make your choices by following this link.

Featured image shows a Polar 3D printer. Unlike Delta or Cartesian 3D printers, it uses Polar coordinates.

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