Promoting STEM education and veterinary science, Army Veterinarian Dr. Turnera Croom has launched a pilot program called “Pooches and 3D Printing.” The aim is to encourage children to get more involved with both veterinary science and 3D printing. Dr. Croom will engage the K-12 students with STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) careers relating to these areas at the program in Michigan.

The kids will get firsthand experience with a 3D printer while learning more about veterinary medicine and careers in animal science and STEM. Similarly, the Australian Government has issued grants to schools recently in order to implement 3D printers to promote STEM education.

Dr. Turnera Croom and a non-3D printed canine. Photo via Vets in 3D.

Dr. Turnera Croom and a non-3D printed canine. Photo via Vets in 3D.

Pooches and 3D Printing

Dr. Turnera Croom is the Founder and CEO of Vets in 3D. Her “Pooches and 3D Printing” event will occur on Friday 31st March from 12pm to 3pm at the Northside Association for Community Development in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Speaking about the event, Dr. Croom said,

The 3D printer will be onsite and lunch will be served to the kids. I also plan to have a Vets In 3D scanning demo where I will have one of my fellow veterans, Petty Officer third class Kevin Ray Fannin, with his dog ‘Raw’ 3D scan his dog and then we will start 3D printing the scan. Kids will be able to see firsthand the newest advance in 3D technology – 3D scanning.

Wehl and Partner brought a 3D printed rottweiler to formnext 2016. Photo by Michael Petch.

Wehl and Partner brought a 3D printed rottweiler to formnext 2016. Photo by Michael Petch.

Animals and 3D printing

We’ve seen how 3D printing can be used to enhance our understanding of animals, and particularly dogs, with research from the NIST. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) evaluated a 3D printed dog nose in order to understand how the animals have such a good sense of smell.

Developments in bioprinting can also benefit animals with the potential to replace their use in drug testing. Harvard has managed to 3D print a functional heart on a chip which could end the use of animals in drug testing.

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Featured image shows 3D printed animals using the Magic Candy Factory 3D printer. Photo via Birmingham Mail.

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