Australian fashion brand Alquema can thank 3D printing and modelling for creating an ‘impossible’ steel clothing rack. When commissioned to design the interior of the new store in Sydney, Rod Faucheux, director of interior design studio Loopcreative, wanted a rail that would be the centerpiece of the store and compliment Alquema’s stylistic simplicity. However, the looping sculptural design he had in mind proved difficult to realise in the flesh; “We had no fewer than five builders tell us that what we had designed could not be built, [but this] only encouraged us to push forward and find someone that could help us realise our unusual new design.”

The steel frame in its parts being constructed. Image via Architecture and Design.

The steel frame in its parts being constructed. Image via Architecture and Design.

Using Autodesk 3DS Max, the design team created 3D renders which were then sent to Alquema in order to show their idea for the space. The renders were also sent to a 3D printing bureau ‘3D Printing Studios’ who 3D printed a scaled version of the design in nylon. This aspect was vital to the project as it enabled the builder of the rack and the client to fully realize how they could achieve the desired effect without the structure toppling over, particularly since they received such negative feedback from builders thus far. The design was dissected into four parts in order to be welded together on-site.

The final design which was fitted in-store. Image via Architecture and Design.

The final design which was fitted in-store. Image via Architecture and Design.

Pleased with the end result, Faucheux commented that it is “Exactly how we had envisioned it in those early design stages” and even requested a small stainless steel replica of the rail to sit in his studio as a reminder of what they accomplished.

Originally reported in Architecture and Design Australia.

Featured image shows the steel clothing rack inside the Sydney Alquema store. Image via Architecture and Design. 

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